Observational Humor — Case Study #156

It’s time for an Observational Humor monologue presented at at the end of a Toastmasters meeting.

THE SET-UP (Providing what happened during the meeting to help you make sense of the jokes.)

1. We had several guests who were young, intelligent and good looking.

2. A guest named Pedi looked like a sophisticated Spanish model with long hair.

3. A speaker said that TM training can teach you sales skills, how to get a date, and how to talk your way out of a traffic ticket.

4. Toastmasters was founded by Ralph Smedley.

5. A guest named Kevin used his cell phone to provide extra light for me after I said that the lights were too dim for me to read my notes.

6. The Toastmaster of the evening made up a speaker introduction because the speaker failed to provide a written introduction.

THE MONOLOGUE

If our guests join our club tonight they will lower our average age, increase our average intelligence, and make us a better looking club.

(This is a self-deprecation joke. It implies that our club members are older than our guests. Less intelligent. Less good looking. Plus it flatters the guests. I would us these comments only if they had a ring of truth, so that the remarks didn’t sound patronizing.)

I don’t know much about Pedi, but I’m sure that he drives a car with soft Corinthian leather.

(Implies that he had the sophisticated look of Ricardo Mantalban. The line got a big laugh.)

Information for our guests, TM training can teach you how to get a date with a traffic cop.

You may have noticed that three people here are known by their initials: JR, TJ and JR. And I am JK.

We encourage people to go by their initials because when we print the agendas it uses less ink.

As a result of tonight’s performance, Melanie receives the Smedley Award for best Toastmaster of the Evening. JR receives the award for best General Evaluator, And the Smedley award for best lighting director goes to Kevin.

(This got a much bigger laugh than I expected. The rule-of-three probably helped. And the fact that a guest stepped in to provide lighting for a speaker was unusual enough to make it a memorable beat.)

(I suggested a couple of opening comments for a speaker who forgot to bring a written, prepared speaker introduction.

1. I remembered to bring my written introduction, but I forgot to give it to the Toastmaster. So I’ll read it to you now: The next speaker needs no introduction.

2. I must say, that was the best introduction I never wrote.)